Honor in the Arts

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Honor in the Arts

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During Chapel on Oct. 24, the band performed and showed how honor connects to music.

The first song the band played was The Mystery of Duffy’s Cut.

“This song was a way of honoring men who lost their lives working on a railroad. It was a representation of their history,” freshman Jennifer Martinez said. “This gives them recognition and honors them because they put in a lot of hard work and were murdered out of nowhere.”

Honor can be shown through music in other ways as well.

“I think the band serves Darlington by bringing music to the football games, and it is honorable to serve your school,” junior Steven Yan said. “Music helps understand honor, and everyone has their own talent that deserves to be honored because of all of the hard work they put into their talent.”

The different chapel services involving the arts are all part of a new way of celebrating Fall for the Arts.

“Instead of thinking of Fall for the Arts and just celebrating it for one day, we wanted to make an opportunity for the school to see and focus on how the arts serve us all the time and embracing it,” Fine Arts Director Kim Tunnell said. “It’s focusing on things that are more internal, like classroom experiences and other things tied to the arts, instead of just all about entertaining.” 

This new idea focuses on how the arts connect with honor.

“The arts serving and providing wisdom and honor is about how we present ourselves. For instance, every performance in the chapel, they represented themselves, and every time you represent something, you have the opportunity to either be honorable or dishonorable,” Tunnell said. “Anytime you embrace and appreciate what you’re doing and give it your all, it makes it honorable.” 

It also surrounds the idea of the arts serving the school and giving wisdom. 

“Every time you have an experience that makes you feel uncomfortable, like performing, and you grow from it, it gives you some wisdom to handle other situations down the road,” Tunnell said. “The students also serve the school by being willing to go up there and perform whatever it is that they’re doing for the school.”

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